Direct-Marketing Secrets to Upselling Your Buyers

Upselling, or selling something to your buyer after their initial purchase, is often the lifeblood of any direct-marketing company.

And what I’m about to tell you is a brain-dead secret that’s so simple, it’s not even funny. Yet, using this strategy will increase your sales, dramatically.

Ready?

O.K., here goes: Conventional wisdom says otherwise, but I will tell you flat-out, to ALWAYS present your most expensive offer first.

See, most people present their smallest offer first, and then they escalate upwards to their next highest-priced offer, and then up again to their highest offer.

And this is why most of your customers take the lowest or “maybe” the middle offer. See, when you go from small to large, customers have to talk themselves “into” spending more money. But when you present your top-dollar offer first, then… your customers are faced with the unpleasant task of having to talk themselves “out” of getting more value.

And who wants to get less value, right?

Also, unless you have a rapport with your customers, or unless you’ve tested your offers, I limit the number of choices in my offers to two. Three choices presents too much confusion, and confusion leads to disconnect. And of course, disconnect leads to no sale being made.

The proof here is in the pudding. On every offer I run, either for myself or for my clients, upwards of 90 to 100% of all buyers opt for the higher-priced item, simply because of this strategy. I kid you not.

Of course, the offers are solid and the value proposition is there, but nevertheless, with percentages like this, can you imagine how much money you’re leaving on the table if you’re NOT doing this?

Look, most people will disagree with this, and they’ll tell you to do it the other, more conventional way. Meaning, to go “up” in price with each option you present. But following conventional wisdom is only going to get you conventional results.

And besides, the numbers don’t lie. Upselling is a critical direct-marketing strategy that can mean the difference between having loads of cash-flow coming in, and just getting by, so make sure you don’t ignore this concept.

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